Economic Vitality

Francophones better educated


Even though the education level of Francophones in Newfoundland and Labrador tends to be higher than the provincial average, a large number of them turn to trade schools to get a certificate instead of going to college.

In total, one out of two Francophones has gone beyond a high school diploma. Many of them (21 percent) undertake university-level studies, compared to 11 percent of the general population. The percentage of Francophones in Newfoundland and Labrador who have gone to university also exceeds the national average for Francophones, which is 16 percent.

These provincial statistics do not show, however, the wide regional diversity in education levels among Francophones. There are marked differences between the rural, resourcedependent areas and the capital, St. John's.
 

Education, 2006, Francophones, Newfoundland and Labrador

Education, 2006, Francophones, Newfoundland and Labrador

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

Francophone employment sectors


The economy of Newfoundland and Labrador depends heavily on the exploitation of natural resources. This being so, the distribution of Francophones among employment sectors is somewhat surprising. Few Francophones are active in the production of goods (agriculture, the processing industries, hunting and fishing).

There are many more Francophones in other sectors: more than 9.8 percent of the population works in the wholesale and retail trades. Francophones are well represented in the public service sector, with more than 43 percent of them working in public administration, education and social services. With this firm foundation in the service economy, Newfoundland Francophones are somewhat less vulnerable to price cycles in the resource sectors.

In Newfoundland and Labrador today, there are approximately 100 businesses where the owners are Francophones or some employees can speak French. These businesses are found mainly in the greater metropolitan area of St. John's and in Western Labrador (Labrador City). Francophones who own businesses or are self-employed make up 4.9 percent of the French-speaking work force. Many of these independent business owners employ others, thus providing jobs for Francophones and other residents of the province.
 

Labour Force by Sector of Activity, 2006, Francophones, Newfoundland and Labrador


 
Number
%
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
30
2.7%
Mining and oil and gas extraction
80
7.1%
Utilities
15
1.3%
Construction
55
4.9%
Manufacturing
40
3.5%
Wholesale Trade
30
2.7%
Retail Trade
80
7.1%
Transportation
50
4.4%
Information Industry
40
3.5%
Finance and Insurance
10
0.9%
Real Estate
20
1.8%
Professional Services
50
4.4%
Management of Companies
0
0.0%
Administrative Services
60
5.3%
Education Services
190
16.8%
Health Care
80
7.1%
Arts
10
0.9%
Accommodation
40
3.5%
Other services
85
7.5%
Public Administration
155
13.7%
All sectors
1,120
100.0%




Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

Occupations


Job distribution by type of occupation is another way of looking at the economic vitality of francophones in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Sales and services are clearly dominant, with one out of four francophones working in this sector. However, it should be noted that income levels in this sector are relatively low. The fact that many francophones are employed in education and government services would seem to restore a balance.
 

Labour Force by Occupation, 2006, Francophones, Newfoundland and Labrador


 
Number
%
Management
85
7.7%
Finance, business and administration
170
15.5%
Natural and applied sciences
60
5.5%
Health
45
4.1%
Social sciences, education and government services
190
17.3%
Arts and culture
35
3.2%
Sales and services
280
25.5%
Trades, transportation and equipment operation
165
15.0%
Primary industry occupations
55
5.0%
Manufacturing industries occupations
15
1.4%
All occupations
1,100
100.0%



Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

Income


The average annual income of Francophones in Newfoundland and Labrador is $36,447, higher than the provincial average of $27,636.

A little more than one Francophone in five has an income under $10,000, which reduces the spending power of the community. On the other hand, many Francophones have higher incomes, and more than a quarter of them earn over $60,000.
 

Total Individual Income, 2006, Francophones, Newfoundland and Labrador

Total Individual Income, 2006, Francophones, Newfoundland and Labrador

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

An economy worth monitoring


With a rising demand for natural resources (mining and oil/gas extraction), the province needs qualified labour to fill specialized positions (winders, mechanics, engineers, etc.). All five Frenchlanguage schools are always looking for teachers and education professionals. The health system needs doctors and specialists. The sales and services sector requires more and more labour at all levels.

The Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador (RDÉE-TNL) and the Fédération des francophones de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador both carry out several community economic development projects throughout the province. These projects include a website (http://www.francotnl.ca), a promotional videodisk called

Osez Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador!, and the Guide touristique en français de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador & Saint-Pierre et Miquelon.

Furthermore, action is being taken to counter the trend of Francophones leaving the province to find work elsewhere. Namely, the RDÉE TNL, working with the Association francophone du Labrador, held a youth, science, technology and prevention camp in Labrador City. The RDÉE TNL will soon launch its Place aux jeunes Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador initiative on the Port au Port peninsula. The goal is to keep and attract youth to that region.