Francophone Diversity

A community with deep roots : born in the province


Seven out of 10 Francophones were born in Saskatchewan. People born elsewhere in Canada account for 23 percent of the population. Only about 6 percent of all Francophones were born outside the country; however, the percentage of French-speaking immigrants has doubled since the last census.

The Fransaskois community is solidly rooted in the province and this is reflected in its sense of identity and belonging.
 

Place of Birth of Francophones, 2006, Saskatchewan

Place of Birth of Francophones, 2006, Saskatchewan

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

A community that is becoming somewhat more diverse


In the past 60 years, only a bit more than 900 Francophones have settled in Saskatchewan. Almost half of them were of European origin, and 55 more came from the United States. Close to 100 came from Latin American countries.

In addition, 1,380 people with French as their first spoken official language have aboriginal roots.
 

Francophone Immigrants, 2006, Saskatchewan

Francophone Immigrants, 2006, Saskatchewan

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

Note: These are people who have been granted immigrant status in Canada, whose first known official language is French.

Immigration is slowly increasing


Forty-five percent of all Francophone immigrants in the province settled after 1996 ; this confirms the increasing role of immigration in the vitality of French in Saskatchewan.
 

Francophone Immigrants by Immigration Period, Saskatchewan

Francophone Immigrants by Immigration Period, Saskatchewan

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

The evolution of immigration


Historically, Saskatchewan was a land of settlement for Francophones from Quebec, Europe, New England, the American Midwest, Ontario and Manitoba. However, this first wave of immigration ended with the Depression in the 1930s. In the last 60 years, the demography has remained stable in terms of numbers – the regular influx of newcomers was countered by an equally important number of people leaving the province. In fact, until recently there was a decrease in the overall population of Saskatchewan.

At the very end of the 20th century, the province once again started receiving immigrants from all over the world. Since the dawn of the 21st century, more and more Francophones from Maghreb, Central Africa and other Francophone countries have chosen to settle in Saskatchewan.

Newcomers can rely on existing French-language institutions. Francophone parishes and Fransaskois schools often act as the entrance point to the local Francophone community. In order to better meet the needs of newcomers, the Francophone associative network has developed specialized services. Namely, the Assemblée communautaire fransaskoise has an immigration sector able to help newcomers; in Saskatoon and Regina, groups have been created to facilitate integration of newcomers by different means.

Saskatchewan receives many inter-provincial migrants; several families arrive in Saskatchewan after first settling in another province.