Linguistic Vitality

Slight stabilization of French spoken at home


In 2006, 4,780 persons said they spoke French most often at home. Even though this number is in constant decrease, it should be noted that this decrease has slowed significantly since 1996.

In addition, a total of 7,945 persons, including 3,870 Anglophones, said they spoke French regularly at home even though this language isn't the most commonly used. This number has increased since 2001, when Statistics Canada introduced this new variable. Thus, French is maintaining its place in Saskatchewan homes.
 

French Spoken at Home, 1971-2006, Saskatchewan

French Spoken at Home, 1971-2006, Saskatchewan

Data from: Marmen and Corbeil, 2004 and Statistics Canada

* Statistics Canada started collecting data on other languages spoken regularly at home in 2001

... and more people know French


In Saskatchewan, the number of people with knowledge of French (alone or with English) has decreased between 2001 and 2006. This reflects the general decrease in the population of the province, which went from 963,150 to 953,850 in the same period. The number of people with knowledge of French has remained more or less stable since 1951.
 

Knowledge of French, 1951-2006, Saskatchewan

Knowledge of French, 1951-2006, Saskatchewan

Data from: Marmen and Corbeil, 2004 and Statistics Canada

A minority of people use French at work


In 2006, some 6,975 people in Saskatchewan said they used French most often or at least regularly at work. Even though this figure accounts for 24.7 percent of workers with knowledge of French, only 1.3 percent of Saskatchewan's active population uses this language at work.
 

Use of French at Work, Active Population with Knowledge of French, 2006, Saskatchewan

Use of French at Work, Active Population with Knowledge of French, 2006, Saskatchewan

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

Linguistic Vitality

More French spoken at home...


In 2006, 19,980 British Columbians said they spoke French most often at home, 2,325 more than in 2001. A total of 37,110 more said they used this language regularly at home; this number includes 17,155 people with English as their mother tongue and close to 6,000 with neither French nor English as their mother tongue.

The popularity of French at home has increased significantly over the years. In 1971, British Columbians who said they spoke French most often at home numbered 11,505.

This increase is a reflection of the great vitality of French in the province, especially since these numbers do not include all the Francophones who speak English at home but are still able to speak French and often do so in other situations outside the home.
 

French Spoken at Home, 1971-2006, British Columbia

French Spoken at Home, 1971-2006, British Columbia

Data from: Marmen and Corbeil, 2006, and Statistics Canada

* Statistics Canada started collecting data on other languages spoken regularly at home in 2001

...And more and more people know French


In 2006, 297,715 people in British Columbia could speak French, representing 7 percent of the population.

Even in a province where most immigrants come from Asian countries, French is the most common language after English, followed with Pendjabi (over 184,000 speakers) and the most common Chinese language, Cantonese (157,180 speakers).

The success of the French language in this province has a lot to do with the popular French immersion system.
 

Knowledge of French, 1951-2006, British Columbia

Knowledge of French, 1951-2006, British Columbia

Data from: Marmen and Corbeil, 2006, and Statistics Canada

French moderately used at work


In 2006, 35,580 British Columbians used French most often or at least regularly at work, a number which accounts for nearly 20 percent of the active population with knowledge of French. It should be noted however that less than 2 percent of the total active population uses French at work.
 

Use of French at Work, 2006, Active Population with Knowledge of French, British Columbia

Use of French at Work, 2006, Active Population with Knowledge of French, British Columbia

Data from: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census