Sources

For the first and second editions of the Profils des communautés francophones and acadiennes, published in 2000 and 2004, respectively, the brief description of the history of the communities was based in large measure on the historical highlights of the provincial and territorial francophonies produced by the Comité national de développement des ressources humaines de la francophonie canadienne. The publication by Philippe Falardeau, entitled Hier la francophonie, published by the FCFA as part of Dessein 2000, and La brève histoire des Canadiens français by Yves Frenette, published by Éditions Boréal, were also sources of inspiration. Lastly, a number of articles collected by Joseph Yvon Thériault in Francophonies minoritaires au Canada - L'état des lieux, published by Éditions de l'Acadie, were used, along with the study by René Guindon and Pierre Poulin entitled Les liens dans la francophonie canadienne.

For the third edition, the articles in the History and Geography sections were updated by FCFA du Canada based on recent developments. Comments on the growth and diversification of the Francophonie in the urban setting were also added.

All the statistics used in the national profile were obtained from Statistics Canada. The following sources were used:

1. National and provincial/territorial data on the first official language spoken, French spoken in the home, knowledge of French, French in the workplace and labour force based on occupation were obtained from the 2006 census and supplied to FCFA du Canada in pre-formatted charts by the statistical research unit at the Official Languages Support Programs branch of Canadian Heritage.

2. Data on the rate of growth of the Francophone population in metropolitan areas and various census divisions were taken from four sources:
 

a. The table First Official Language Spoken (7) and Sex (3) for Population, for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas, 2001 Census, Cat. No. 97F0007XCB2001045 at Statistics Canada

b. The table First Official Language Spoken (7) for Population, for Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 2001 Census, Cat. No. 97F0007XCB2001048 at Statistics Canada

c. The table First Official Language Spoken (7), Mother Tongue (10), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the population, Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2006 Census, Cat. No. 97-555-XCB2006031 at Statistics Canada

d. The table First Official Language Spoken (7), Mother Tongue (10), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the population, Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 2006 Census, Cat. No. 97-555-XCB2006030 at Statistics Canada.


3. All regional data on the first official language spoken and the age distribution of Francophones were compiled using the table First Official Language Spoken (7), Mother Tongue (10), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the Population, Cat. No. 97-555-X2006030 at Statistics Canada.

4. Data on the number of Canadians with English as a mother tongue speaking French regularly at home were compiled using the table Detailed Language Spoken Most Often at Home (186), Other Language Spoken Regularly at Home (9), Mother Tongue (8), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the Population, Cat. No. 97-555-X2006045 at Statistics Canada.

5. Data on French-speaking immigrants by period of immigration, place of birth of Francophones and place of origin of French-speaking newcomers were compiled using the Statistics Canada product Selected Demographic, Cultural, Educational, Labour Force and Income Characteristics (780), First Official Language Spoken (4), Age Groups (8A) and Sex (3) for the Population, Cat. No. 97-555-XCB2006054. Data on education, labour market participation, employment sectors, occupations and income are from the same source.

6. Data on the evolution of Canada's linguistic composition from 1951 to 2001 (mother tongue, language spoken at home, first official language spoken, etc.) were taken from New Canadian Perspectives: Languages in Canada, 2001 Census, by Louise Marmen and Jean-Pierre Corbeil, 2004.

Regarding the statistics on mother tongue, the language spoken at home and the first official language spoken, whether or not multiple responses are included (for example, Francophones who have also reported English as a mother tongue) can affect the numbers. Marmen and Corbeil have distributed the multiple responses among the reported languages. However, the data presented by FCFA for 2006 include all persons who have French as their mother tongue/first official language spoken/language spoken in the home, whether or not it is the only language reported.

The narrative information on community vitality, on the infrastructures that are in place to encourage Francophone immigration, and on economic vitality were compiled by the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne (FCFA) du Canada with the assistance of its members.