The Last 30 Years

1978
Tabling of the Policy on Minority Language Instruction;

1982
Adoption of the Franco-Albertan flag, designed by Jean-Pierre Grenier;

1987
The speaker of the Legislative Assembly asks the member Léo Piquette to apologize because he spoke French during Question Period. Léo Piquette refuses. On December 1, more than 400 people protest in front of the Alberta legislature to show their support for Léo Piquette, who ultimately wins the right to speak French in the legislature if he first distributes an English copy of his remarks.

1988
Adoption of Bill 60, abolishing the linguistic rights conferred by article 110 of the Northwest Territories Act. Alberta officially becomes a unilingual English province.

1990
The Supreme Court of Canada recognizes the right to school governance in the Mahé judgement. This case had been before the courts since 1983.

1993
The Alberta government adopts Bill 8, and recognizes the right of Francophones to governance of their 21 schools. Some of those schools were established as early as 1984, namely the école Maurice-Lavallée in Edmonton and the école Sainte-Anne in Calgary, which later became école Sainte-Marguerite-Bourgeoys.

1999
Creation of Alberta's provincial Francophone Secretariat on March 16.

2005
After 40 years withouth Francophone representation in the Senate, Alberta celebrates the appointment of a Franco-Albertan senator, the Honourable Claudette Tardif.

2007
L'empreinte francophone, a monument erected on the grounds of the provincial legislature in honour of Alberta's Francophones, is unveiled on June 28. The monument was created by artist Herman Poulin and contains the imprints of 1,166 Francophones, collected in 12 regions of the province.

2008
On July 2, the Provincial Court renders a decision in favour of Gilles Caron, who had challenged the validity of a traffic ticket written in English only. The Court rules that respect of the linguistic rights of Francophones was a condition for entry of the Northwest Territories (which then included Alberta) into Confederation. The province decides to appeal this decision.